Category Archives: Author: Jaclyn Moriarty

The Murder of Bindy Mackenzie

The Murder of Bindy MacKenzie
Jaclyn Moriarty

What!? Does she actually get murdered?

What!? Does she actually get murdered?

Quick Stats:

Page Count: 494
Age Range: 12 and up
Year: 2006
Genre: Mystery
Series: 3rd of 4

In their eleventh year, Ashbury High students are required to take a new class called “Friendship and Development” or FAD. Bindy Mackenzie, who was featured at the end of the previous book as the fastest typist known to man, has a type A and neurotic personality. She becomes convinced that her FAD class, a group of 8, is out to get her and she spends most of her year trying to take them down all while dealing with being a teenager.

Of all the series, this book is written the most differently. It is written entirely from Bindy’s perspective in the form of her notes to herself and to the school board trying to get the FAD class dismantled. The story is told very intriguingly and offers a lot of insight into be a teenager. It is funny and the outcome of the mystery is shocking! A good read. Of the four of the series, it is probably my least favorite though.

-Emily T.

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Filed under Age Range: 12 and up, Author: Jaclyn Moriarty, Genre: Mystery, Genre: Realistic, Page Count: 400-500, Part of a Series, Year: 2000s

The Ghosts of Ashbury High

The Ghosts of Ashbury High
Jaclyn Moriarty

Parting is such sweet sorrow...

Parting is such sweet sorrow…

Quick Stats:

Page Count: 345
Age Range: 12 and up
Year: 2010
Genre: Realistic
Series: 4th of 4

In the final installment of The Ashbury-Brookfield books, the author tells the story of some familar characters’ and some new characters’ last year in high school through their exam essays and blogs. Em Thompson becomes obsessed with the new kids at school and the ghost in the Art rooms, focusing her final year on these two subjects. The new kids and Em’s friends all have skeletons and ghosts in their closets that they have to face before they can graduate. Each of these stories is interconnected and told from many different points of view.

The themes in this book are more mature than the previous three books. It’s still incredibly funny and intelligent. I didn’t want it to end and it left me wanting to know more about what would happen and the characters.

-Emily T.

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Filed under Age Range: 12 and up, Author: Jaclyn Moriarty, Genre: Realistic, Page Count: 300-400, Part of a Series, Year: 2010s

Feeling Sorry for Celia

Feeling Sorry for Celia
Jaclyn Moriarty

Why? Does she have to eat lemons for dinner?

Why? Does she have to eat lemons for dinner?

Quick Stats:

Page Count: 276
Age Range: 12 and up
Year: 2000
Genre: Realistic
Series: 1st of 4

When Elizabeth’s best friend runs away at the beginning of the school year to join the circus, Elizabeth has to face high school alone. Elizabeth is also forced to write to a complete stranger at the local private school by her English teacher to revive the “art of the envelope.” Right as Elizabeth and her pen-pal start getting closer and the boy on the bus starts to notice her, Celia comes back and turns everything upside-down again.

This book offers a great look into friendships in middle school and high school. The voices of the characters are very bright and funny. It’s a great read.

-Emily T.

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Filed under Age Range: 12 and up, Author: Jaclyn Moriarty, Genre: Realistic, Page Count: 200-300, Part of a Series, Year: 2000s

The Year of Secret Assignments

The Year of Secret Assignments 
Jaclyn Moriarty

New secret assignment: read about this book.

New secret assignment: read about this book.

Quick Stats:

Page Count: 340
Age Range: 12 and up
Year: 2003
Genre: Realistic
Series: 2nd of 4

Students of two rival schools are assigned to begin a pen-pal relationship with each other for class. Three girls and three boys start exchanging emails that lead to suspense, lying, pranks, and secrets.

This book is great for middle schoolers. It’s about older students and is written in emails, letters, text messages and memos, making it relatable. It also shows a variety in writing styles.

-Emily T.

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Filed under Age Range: 12 and up, Author: Jaclyn Moriarty, Genre: Realistic, Page Count: 300-400, Part of a Series, Year: 2000s